Group Morale Boosters! 5 Leadership Team Building Activities

As a keynote speaker sometimes I get the opportunity to do a follow up leadership seminar at the event. I find team building self development activities really need to be catered to the group or they are a generic time drain.

A good self development leadership activity makes people laugh, think, understand conflict and work together outside of their work context. Here are some fun, inspirational and memorable morale boosters for your next seminar, convention or event:

1. In a seminar, I like breaking down the room based on 4 personality types ( after I have described what they are, characteristics, etc)and than asking the group to solve a business problem by creating a team, based on what personalities they want on it. What will each personality type contribute? How? What will be the drawbacks? In a true Donald Trump Apprentice Style way the problem could be to create an advertising campaign to promote a specific product. The discussion that ensues will help people see how personality styles create conflict and affect how you contribute to a team.

2. Another a fun, simple self development seminar team activity, based on improv…. is create a story with a word. Each person in a line up adds a word to make up a story. Some people don’t listen or get nervous and they put in a word that makes no sense and word by word the group tries to make a sensible story. Usually very halarious and great lessons emerge about listening, interpretation, resolving conflict etc. You can create the story around a business theme you are working on to personalize this.

3. A simple and easy seminar activity is to tell two truths and a lie. In rounds of 8, each person tells two true statements about themselves and one lie. The group has to decide which is the lie. A good way to get to know one another and very funny.

4. Balloons are Morale Boosters! Blow up a bunch of balloons of several colours. Have the whole room stand up. The objective is to keep the balloons in the air no matter what, they can’t touch the ground. Seminar participants boink balloons to each other, gyrating around trying to keep them in the air. For variation, ask the group to move the red balloons to the front of the room, the green balloons to the back of the room, etc.

5. What I like about you. A great event icebreaker, Have a flip chart paper for each person with their name at the top. Each person goes around and writes what they like about others on their respective paper. Afterwards, the posters can be displayed at work. It is a great morale booster when people can look up at their positive leadership qualities.

6. First Meeting. Have 3 people on each team( usually 3 men and 3 women on opposing teams). The objective is for each team of three to act in synch as one person. They are to meet the other team and each team is one person, they move together and talk together. Step by step and word by word each team member is looking for clues from one person ( usually a leader will emerge) on when to move, words to say etc. It is hilarious and teaches leadership ( if one person in each team doesn’t take control and lead the other two in words and movement- it is a mess), communications skills, teamwork.

Add more fun at your event with simple, easy morale boosters that build leadership qualities.

Ten Ways Leadership Can Motivate Team Building and Performance

Managers, supervisors, and team leaders need to understand how communication and recognition can help motivate members to have better attitudes and become more productive. Many ways exist to motivate team members to build a better team and increase the group and individual performance.

Presented for consideration are ten possible ways for managers, supervisors, and leaders to motivate their team with little budget and resources that may not require higher-level management approval. Most ideas can be implemented merely by a change in accountability or the way the manager or leader communicates with the team and encourages the group to grow itself.

  1. Be positive and set a good example for the team.
  2. Share information on projects and business openly with the team.
  3. When possible, let them work through their conflicts, but be ready to resolve negative conflict and bad situations before team morale is damaged.
  4. Give feedback for improvement when necessary in a positive and thoughtful way.
  5. Show appreciation for the work they do using different methods for rewarding the group and members.
  6. If a team request or member idea is not understood, ask for clarification or examples.
  7. Actively listen to team complaints, ideas, and improvements.
  8. Allow the team to evaluate its leader and suggest improvement ideas to help them build respect, trust, and confidence in their leader.
  9. Show confidence in the team by supporting their work and needs.
  10. Do periodic team assessments with the members on how the group is doing as a way to increase awareness of what is right and identify opportunities for improvement.

Selecting from these ten ways to motivate teams, the team leader, supervisor, or manager can implement a strategy for building the team and improving individual performance as well. All it may take is changing the way the manager, supervisor, or leader communicates with and encourages the team’s potential growth, as well as the members accepting responsibility for their progress. The result should be improved team member attitudes, better group behaviors, and increasing work productivity.

NOTE: See also list of articles for “Ten Ideas to Reward Teams and Members,” “Evaluate Team Performance and Determine Training Needs,” “Eleven Responsibilities of Great Team Leaders and Sponsoring Managers,” and “Give Your Teams the Gift of Productivity.”